How was the Marburg virus spread?

How was the Marburg virus spread?

The virus spreads through direct contact (such as through broken skin or mucous membranes in the eyes, nose, or mouth) with: Blood or body fluids* (urine, saliva, sweat, feces, vomit, breast milk, amniotic fluid, and semen) of a person who is sick with or died from Marburg virus disease, or.

What is the vector of Marburg virus?

Rousettus aegyptiacus, fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family, are considered to be natural hosts of Marburg virus. The Marburg virus is transmitted to people from fruit bats and spreads among humans through human-to-human transmission.

How was the Marburg virus cured?

There is no specific treatment for Marburg virus disease. Supportive hospital therapy should be utilized, which includes balancing the patient’s fluids and electrolytes, maintaining oxygen status and blood pressure, replacing lost blood and clotting factors, and treatment for any complicating infections.

Is the Marburg virus airborne?

Ebola and Marburg virus diseases are not airborne diseases and are generally considered not to be contagious before the onset of symptoms. Transmission requires direct contact with blood, secretions, organs, or other bodily fluids of dead or living infected people or animals.

Where did the Marburg virus originate in Africa?

Two unrelated sporadic cases in travellers occurred during 2008 following visits to the “python cave” in the Maramagambo Forest in western Uganda; this cave is home to a large colony of Egyptian fruit bats. Both people became ill after return to their home country; one in the Netherlands and one in the USA.

Where was the cave of death in Marburg located?

Two decades later, a cave in neighboring Uganda would divulge some of Marburg’s secrets. In the wake of an outbreak among miners working at Kitaka Cave, scientists detected the virus in local Egyptian fruit bats, the same species of bat that occasionally shacks up in Kitum.

How to prevent secondary transmission of Marburg virus?

Measures for prevention of secondary transmission of Marburg virus are similar to those used for other haemorrhagic fever viruses, and focus on avoiding contact with infected bodily fluids. See ACDP algorithm and guidance on management of patients.

When did Kitum Cave in Kenya become famous?

Kitum Cave, in Mount Elgon National Park, Kenya, became well known in the 1980s when two European visitors contracted Marburg virus there.

How was the Marburg virus spread? The virus spreads through direct contact (such as through broken skin or mucous membranes in the eyes, nose, or mouth) with: Blood or body fluids* (urine, saliva, sweat, feces, vomit, breast milk, amniotic fluid, and semen) of a person who is sick with or died from Marburg virus disease,…